200 Hour Vinyasa Flow Yoga Teacher Training in Rishikesh At Himalayan Yoga Association

Best yoga Association & yoga teacher training school in Rishikesh. There are only some authentic yoga teacher training schools that combines quality yoga teachings with blissful environment and useful combination of theory and practices. People who wants to become a real yoga practitioner and want to understand power of yoga practices should join Himalayan yoga Association yoga courses, stay in Association for a month or two months even ones can stay at Association with us more than 3 to 5 months in order to deepen their yoga practices. There are different types of training programs and courses for all walks of life people offered by Association in Rishikesh and one of the most popular of them is the 200 hours vinyasa flow yoga teacher training course in Rishikesh.

About 200 Hours Vinyasa flow yoga teacher training in Rishikesh

28 Days 200 Hours Vinyasa Flow Yoga Teacher Training In Rishikesh

28 days vinyasa flow yoga teacher training course is completely dedicated to offer vinyasa flow teachings, during the course everyday students will be dedicating their 3 hours in vinyasa flow learning and rest hours in other subjects of the course. Course is yoga alliance certified after successful completion of the course students will be awarded with 200 Hours Vinyasa Flow yoga teacher training certificate by Himalayan Yoga Ashram that enables them to teach yoga in any country around the world.

This certificate is all you need to immediately apply for your Yoga Alliance RYT200 Certification, a certification recognized world-wide.

WHAT IS VINYASA KRAMA YOGA?

VINVASA KARMA YOGA is an ancient practice of physical and spiritual development. It is a systematic method to study, practice, teach, and adapt yoga. This vinyasa krama (movement and sequence methodology) approach to yogasana (yoga posture) practice is unique in all of yoga. By integrating the functions of mind, body, and breath in the same time frame, a practitioner will experience the real joy of yoga practice. Each of the important postures (asanas) is practiced with many elaborate vinyasas (variations and movements). Each variation is linked to the next one by a succession of specific transitional movements, synchronized with the breath. The mind closely follows the slow, smooth, deliberate ttjjayi yogic breathing; and the yoking of mind and body takes place with the breath acting as the harness.

THE PARAMETERS OF VINYASA YOGA

The Sanskrit word vinyasa comes from a prefix which means variation, and a suffix nyasa, which means “within prescribed parameters.” The parameters prescribed in classical yoga with respect to yogasanas, as contained in Yoga Sutra of Patanjali, are:

 

STEADINESS (STHIRA)

For a posture to qualify as a yogasana, it should afford the practitioner the ability to remain steady in that posture, be it standing on his or her feet (tadasana) or standing on his or her head (sirsasana).

 

COMFORT (SUKHA)

Use of breath and the close attention of the mind to the breath, which are the hallmarks of yoga, ensure that there are considerable joy and relaxation for the practitioner.

 

SMOOTH AND LONG BREATHING (PRAYATNA SITHILA)

This is the method prescribed by Patanjali to facilitate yoga practice. Prayatna (effort) here refers to jivana prayatna, or effort of life, which, as you can guess, is breathing. This condition stipulates that while practicing asanas, the breath should be smooth and long. So, while doing yoga correctly, one should not pant heavily. In contrast to aerobic exercise (which itself has benefits), neither the breathing rate nor heart rate should increase while practicing yoga. Our normal breathing rate is about fifteen to twenty breaths per minute. Since the movements are slow in vinyasa yoga, one has to slow one’s breathing rate as well. A good guideline to follow is taking no more than six breaths per minute. One should inhale for five seconds during an expansive movement (such as stretching the arms or legs or bending backward) and exhale smoothly when folding forward, turning, twisting, bending the knees, or doing similar body contractions.

 

The smooth inhalation accompanying expansive movement is known as brahmana kriya, or expansive (breathing) action; the exhalation during contraction of the body is langhana kriya, or reducing or contracting (breathing) action. When you inhale while making an expansive movement and correspondingly exhale during contraction, this is known as anuloma, or “with the grain” movement/breathing. Anuloma exercise creates harmony between the tissues of the breathing organs and the body. Though anuloma is the general rule, there are situations in which one might or should exhale during an expansive movement. (The converse, however, is never the case because contractive movements cannot be performed while inhaling.) This might be recommended when the practitioner is tense, obese, old, or stiff. Take the example of the cobra pose. From the lyingdown position, moving into cobra pose is an expansive movement should be done on inhalation. But some especially tense people find this extremely uncomfortable because they tend to stiffen their muscles and virtually prevent their back from bending. A similar situation may arise with obese people because the belly tends to add pressure while inhaling. So, people with these conditions may breathe out while doing expansive movements. It is for the student and/or teacher to determine what type of breathing is appropriate for a particular vinyasa. One general rule is, “When in c doubt, do the movement while exhaling.

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Date- 05-12-2017
Written by- Himanshu joshi
Copy rights- www.himalayanyogaashram.com